Longtime Dinner Tour Sponsor Syndicate Sales Unveils New Products on Chapple’s Farm

The American Grown Field to Vase Dinner Tour tends to make news in the communities where it stops. But at a recent stop at Hope Flower Farm in Waterford, Virginia, the dinner was the site of a very special announcement from longtime tour sponsor Syndicate Sales.

Guests of our recent Field to Vase Dinner in Waterford, Virginia, enjoyed both the beauty of Hope Flower Farm and the stunning designs created by Holly Chapple.  Photo: Taken by Sarah Photography.

The firm announced the “Holly Heider Chapple Exclusively for Syndicate” line of containers and mechanics to be released in January 2018. Of course, there was nowhere better to launch the line than right there on Chapple’s farm!

Anne Graves of Syndicate Sales made the exciting announcement of their partnership with Holly Chapple during the dinner.  Photo: Taken by Sarah Photography.

Syndicate Sales Public Relations Manager Anne Graves says the company partnered with Chapple to design a line of containers that’s fluid and romantic, much like Chapple’s decadent design style. The products will help designers achieve Chapple’s sprawling, airy look.

The new product line also includes the mechanics needed to achieve the Holly-like aesthetic.

The containers, available in clear glass and opaque black and white durable plastic, feature a footed compote design.

One of Holly Chapple’s gorgeous designs that captivated guests at our Field to Vase Dinner at Hope Flower Farm. Photo: Taken by Sarah Photography.

The upscale glass containers are perfect for “show-stopper” arrangements. The plastic compotes are made of light but durable plastic and are great for transporting Chapple’s unmistakable floral design look to venues.

The mechanics are what Chapple refers to as a “pillow and an egg” ­– grid-like tools to hold flowers in place in containers. These spectacular mechanics eliminate the hassles of fussing with chicken wire and other materials to create loose horizontal bouquets. The “egg” concept lets designers insert flower stems from all angles while keeping them in place during the design process.

The “pillow” follows the same principle, resting on the top of the vase rim and ensuring stems stay in one place and remain hydrated without getting crushed. Because the mechanic rests on top of the container, stems can be inserted around the rim, appearing to spill gracefully over the vase’s edge.

All products in the line are reusable and 100 percent recyclable.

Graves said the recent American Grown Field to Vase Dinner was the ultimate place to launch the line – after all, Syndicate is a quintessential family-owned American company based in Indiana.

Syndicate’s three-year sponsorship of the dinner tour is equally impressive. “There was no more fitting place than at a Field to Vase Dinner, where the crux of the event is about American Grown, to launch the line. And there’s nothing we like to celebrate more than the people, relationships and culture that keeps our industry going,” Graves explains. “It’s a natural fit.”

Naturally, Certified American Grown is extremely grateful for Syndicate’s ongoing support!

For details on the new container and mechanics collection and to sign up for exclusive updates regarding the January 2018 release, check out holly.syndicatesales.com.

Certified Farmer Andrea Gagnon Shares the Origin Matters Message, Wows With Her Flowers

The November issue of the National Geographic features Certified American Grown flower farmers Andrea Gagnon of Lynnvale Studios.

It’s not every day that National Geographic rings your phone. But that’s exactly what flower farmer Andrea Gagnon experienced when the renowned publication reached out to her to request an interview and photo shoot on her Gainesville, Virginia, farm.

The coverage – touting the American Grown Flower movement – can be found in the venerated magazine’s November 2017 issue.

“I grew up in a household where National Geographic was renowned and never thrown away,” Gagnon explains. “It was an incredible process. The photographer came out months before the article was written and we spent seven solid hours shooting.” Yep, seven hours.

Shooting what? Just-picked American Grown Flowers from Gagnon’s LynnVale Studios, a 10-acre flower farm and art studio owned and operated by Gagnon and husband, Lou.

In the course of the photo shoot, the Gagnons created bouquets and centerpieces, along with four versions of a “flower painting” on the barn floor and a stoop. It was one of the flower painting images that became the hero shot in the magazine.

Beautiful American Grown Flowers arranged by Andrea Gagnon were used to represent the bounty and renewed consumer interest in homegrown blooms.

“It was a thrill to observe and participate in the whole process,” Gagnon says. “It ranks among the top five of all of my professional experiences. I felt like I had been on a roller coaster thrill ride of design. I remember looking at Lou when it was over and I could barely stand up. It was so overwhelming and big.”

Also big – the opportunity to drive home the origin matters message, which Gagnon did with prowess in the article.

“The more awareness the American consumer has about where flowers come from, the better it is for all of  us,” she’s quoted as saying. “It’s just like asking, ‘Is this a local tomato for my BLT?’ Now people can ask, ‘Oh, is that a local dahlia?’”

How it happened

So how did the American Grown Flowers movement catch the eye of National Geographic?

Turns out that a writer for the magazine was one of the members of the media who were invited to attend the American Grown Field to Vase Dinner Tour held at LynnVale Studios in 2015. Months later, Gagnon received a call from the writer and the odyssey of making it into print began.

The flower farm at Lynnvale Studios played host to one of ten American Grown Field to Vase dinners held in 2015. Photo by Linda Blue Photography

During the interview there were lots of questions about the American Grown Flower movement and why it’s important to have consumer awareness about flower origin.

Flower farmer and floral designer Andrea Gagnon of Lynnvale Studios. Andrea also serves as a member of the Certified American Grown Council. Photo by Linda Blue Photography

“I never imagined it would make the magazine. What are the odds? I didn’t know until last week that it actually made it in,” Gagnon explains.

But it did. And Gagnon is still on cloud nine. She can’t wait for her father, the longtime National Geographic subscriber, who now lives in an assisted living facility, to see the coverage.

“I’m just so pleased for flower farmers and for these efforts to be acknowledged,” Gagnon says.

More photos from the American Grown Field to Vase Dinner at Lynnvale Studios can be found on our Flickr page. Simply click the photo to see more beautiful images from the flower farm. Photo from Linda Blue Photography

Earning the designation of “Design Star” is no small feat in a nationwide community of talented floral designers. And when Christy Hulsey, owner and creative director of Colonial House of Flowers in Statesboro, Georgia, earned the designation of 2017 Mayesh Design Star, she admits to being overwhelmed. And deeply honored.

Christy Hulsey (right) has been sharing her love and support for American Grown Flowers while crisscrossing the country as Mayesh’s 2017 Design Star. 

As she puts it, it’s not every day that an “old-school” flower shop gets this kind of recognition.

But Hulsey’s not one to rest on her laurels. She’s making the most of the honor by wowing guests who participate in the Mayesh Design Star Flower Workshop Tour – with eight stops at Mayesh wholesale flower branches nationwide featuring hands-on workshops. And along with giving students a great opportunity to network, explore floral design, and brush up on social media and marketing tactics, Hulsey is sure to talk about a topic close to her heart. The origin of flowers and the importance of using Certified American Grown Flowers in designs.

“I believe origin matters. I know what various farms do really well and what I’m going to get, so when I’m creating a flower recipe, I need to know what I’m looking for and what farm can deliver it,” Hulsey explains.

Christy and her family had the opportunity to tour our flower farms while on the road for Mayesh workshops throughout the country.

It’s thinking wholesaler Mayesh also understands and supports. After all, Mayesh is a sponsor of the American Grown Field to Vase Dinner Tour, the award-winning pop-up dinner series that’s been criss-crossing America for three years.

For Hulsey, choosing Certified American Grown Flowers is deeply personal. She recalls how Mel Resendiz of Resendiz Brothers Protea Growers took her entire family on a tour of his farm, showcasing the flowers he grows and sharing his family’s story. From that day forward, Hulsey felt it was important to incorporate flowers from Resendiz’s farm when her designs called for it. “It’s important that I use a flower from his farm and think of him. It’s meaningful.”

Hulsey will carry the message to her next stop on the Design Star Flower Workshop Tour on Oct. 17 in Portland, Oregon. In fact, she continually shares the origin matters message in her social media posts for the tour and her stops at Pottery Barn stores nationwide where she leads succulent workshops for consumers and uses Certified American Grown plants.

What does she want florists and consumers to know? Using and buying Certified American Grown Flowers isn’t hard. It is important. And it does make a difference. And yes, origin does matter.

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